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With having the Elder Scrolls series banked as my favorite game franchise, it would be odd if I didn’t spend some time talking about their multiplayer game. I pre-ordered the game, tried it at its release in 2014 and hated it. It didn’t have the Elder Scrolls feeling (people who have played it would know what I mean), and I decided to just give it a year to settle in. A lot of online multiplayer games have a rough launch so after a year I decided to try it again  after they also released it on consoles, and I fell in love. They had made a lot of changes, fixed a lot of bugs with patches and I was excited to get into it. Here’s an excerpt from the wikipedia page to give you some information about the game:

As in previous The Elder Scrolls titles, gameplay is mostly nonlinear, with a mixture of quests, random events, and free-roaming exploration of the world. The game does not provide a mode for single-player offline play, although the developers stated that there would be “plenty of content” designed to accommodate players who prefer to play solo. The player is able to play as ten different races; four different varieties of humans: Nords, Redguards, Bretons, and Imperials; Elvish varieties: Dunmer (Dark Elves), Altmer (High Elves), Bosmer (Wood Elves) and Orsimer (Orcs); and more bestial races: the Khajiiti and Argonians. Players must choose one of four classes when creating their character. Each class gives the player various different attacks, spells, and passive effects. The game has other character choices beyond those of race and class, such as the player character also being able to become either a vampire or a werewolf, each of which grants its own skill tree.

As with other games in The Elder Scrolls series, the game is set on the continent of Tamriel. The events of the game occur a millennium before those of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim and around 800 years before The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind and The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion. It has a broadly similar structure to Skyrim, with two separate conflicts progressing at the same time, one with the fate of the world in the balance, and one where the prize is supreme power on Tamriel. In The Elder Scrolls Online, the first struggle is against the Daedric Prince Molag Bal, who is attempting to meld the plane of Mundus with his realm of Coldharbour, and the second is to capture the vacant imperial throne, contested by three alliances of the mortal races. The player character has been sacrificed to Molag Bal, and Molag Bal has stolen their soul; the recovery of which is the primary game objective.

Many parts of the continent of Tamriel are available in the game, with most zones being accessible based on faction. Some zones are accessible with DLC-only from the Crown Store, while others are accessible to players of any faction when they reach a certain level. Players have the opportunity to join any of the three factions warring over the Ruby Throne of the Emperor of Tamriel: the First Aldmeri Dominion (represented by an eagle) led by Queen Ayrenn, composed of the Altmer (High Elf), Bosmer (Wood Elf), and Khajiit races; the Daggerfall Covenant (represented by a lion) led by High King Emeric, composed of the Bretons, Redguard, and Orsimer (Orcs); and the Ebonheart Pact (represented by a dragon) led by Jorunn Skald-King, composed of the Nord, Dunmer (Dark Elf), and Argonian races. Players may also unlock an additional race, Imperial, which may be a part of any of the three factions. The other major ruling faction of Tamriel is the Empire, led by Empress Regent Clivia Tharn, which has fallen into instability and disrepair, and serves as a non-joinable faction. Pre-ordered copies of the game included the “Explorers’ Pack”, which allowed all races to be played in each of the factions, and this feature is available in the Crown Store.

The game begins in the Wailing Prison in Coldharbor, where the player character’s soulless husk has been enslaved. This opening continues another The Elder Scrolls tradition, of beginning the game with the player as a prisoner. After escaping, the base of operations becomes the Harborage, a cave found at each of the starting cities, and is where the Prophet opens portals to the locations of the main questline. Once the Amulet of Kings is retrieved, the headquarters shift to the Hollow City, a location in central Coldharbour blessed by Meridia. Civilians saved from Coldharbour’s prisons arrive in the Hollow City, and it is from there that attacks on Molag Bal’s controlled areas are orchestrated.

As for the statement where they say there is a lot of content for one to play solo; that is absolutely true! It’s sad to say, but I have played the game solo for years, not grouping up with others for anything but dungeons and I have yet to encounter any issues with playing alone.

I used to play the game on my computer, but I gave in sometime last year and purchased it for my Xbox One too, which ties in with my issue of having to own games on a lot of different platforms. I did a post about that last year, but I can’t seem to find it.. Anyways, there isn’t really a difference between the platforms, I just prefer playing some games on a console where the controller is native, instead of having to use a third party controller where some of the buttons won’t work or wont be mapped right.

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My recent Argonian templar character.

The character I currently play as has to be one of my favorites. I had never tried to play as an Argonian before ( I usually just play as a redguard), and I thought I would hate it because the lizard people have always seemed to be so weird with their talk of the hist and whatnot. But I was pleasantly surprised when I leveled up a bit and actually got into the game. There is a quest line in the Hatching Pools where you have to save Argonian eggs from being destroyed and I related to it much more this time around than what I had done before.

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My horse is on fire. Literally.

Recently they released a new “chapter” for the game, incorporating the rest of Morrowind. The first thing I did was to go to Seyda Neen to see the iconic Silt Strider that you see when you first start up the “The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind” game itself. It was very fun to see it in “HD” and to relive the memory of booking a journey to either Gnisis or Suran. You also get a whole new world to discover, new quests to do, new recipes to make, new appearances to collect, new furniture and new homes to purchase. I’m really enjoying it, and hoping that the next chapter will be Oblivion, even though a lot of the areas are already in the game. Or maybe more of Skyrim… or.. Elsweyr? I don’t know, I feel like I’m just ranting at this point so it seems like a good place to stop. Have you played any of the Elder Scrolls games before? 
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Here’s some general information about the game:
(taken from its wikipedia article.)

The plot is loosely based on Jules Verne’s novel Around the World in Eighty Days. The year is 1872 and Monsieur Phileas Fogg has placed a wager at the Reform Club that he can circumnavigate the world in eighty days or less. The game follows the course of this adventure, as narrated by Phileas Fogg’s manservant Passepartout, whose actions and decisions are controlled by the player.

After leaving London on an underwater train to Paris or a caleche to Cambridge, the player can choose their own route around the world, travelling from city to city. Each city and journey contains unique narrative content. The developers estimate that on one complete circumnavigation of the globe players will see approximately 2% of the game’s 750,000 words of textual content.

In their role as valet, players must manage finances, their master’s health, and time as well as buying and selling items in different markets around the globe. The choices made by the player in story sections can also have a large impact on how the journey proceeds.

The game has several secrets, Easter Eggs and hidden endings, with the rarest having been seen by as few as 8 players, as well as several references to Verne’s works, including Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and From the Earth to the Moon. The game is also partly inspired by the steampunk genre, featuring such elements as sapient mechanical transport, hovercraft, submersibles and an entire city that walks on four gigantic legs.

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I found this screenshot from a mobile version, the pc interface is a bit different.

As a interactive fiction game, it is great! With each journey you get to choose between simply rushing through the journey to arrive in a new city or interact with your master or any of the passengers. The funniest moment I had during my first play through was when Passepartout somehow ended up sneaking into a harem where he was not supposed to be, and left wearing a woman’s silk outfit because he had to disguise himself. You don’t really get to see him in the outfit but it shows up in your inventory afterwards so you can just let your imagination run wild.

In most of the cities you can buy a pamphlet that reveals new routes you can take and each route has a different transport method, a different price, different comforts and different departure times. Sometimes if you reach a city that hasn’t revealed any new routes, just explore it and you will find something new. You can also purchase items in the market to reduce the travel penalty that applies to your master. He has a total of a hundred hearts that reduce whenever you travel, and regenerate whenever you rest at a hotel, for example.

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There are so many routes to take, so many things you can do differently and I feel like this is a game with a lot of replayability! After my first few attempts, I feel like I have learned more about how to more effectively travel the world so I am very interested and eager to start the game up again to see what different outcomes I can get and how I can shorten down the travel time to make it in less than eighty days. I would definitely recommend this game to anyone who wouldn’t mind a sort of text heavy game that is more about enjoying the game for what it is rather than relying on action to be happening all of the time!

Have you played 80 Days before or anything similar? Feel free to share your experiences!

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When Fallout Shelter was first released in July 2015, I was immediately hooked, but I lost interest very easily. I don’t know why it happened, but I stopped playing for like a year and six months until it now recently got released on xbox one. I thought the console version of it would be really weird after trying the pc version and not liking it as much, but i was pleasantly surprised and I am enjoying it a lot. It might be because it’s more convenient for me to just turn on my xbox and play instead of starting up my pc all of the time.

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Basically, what you do in the game is to manage and build your own vault. You have to make sure that you produce enough power, food and water so that your dwellers stay happy. You assign them to the different rooms based on their S.P.E.C.I.A.L stats, with power needing S (Strength), water needing P (Perceptance) and food needing A (Agility). The stats are the same that are used in the main Fallout games so you’ll get a hang of it pretty quickly if you have played any of them beforehand. However, previous experience with the Fallout franchise isn’t really needed, as the game is a simulation rather than a role playing game like the rest.

Apart from producing resources, you can have your dwellers mate to populate the vault, defend and protect the vault from raiders or deathclaw attacks, send them on quests or just have them explore the wasteland. Their survival is not guaranteed so you will have to make sure to build science labs and medical bays to produce Stimpacks and RadAways. If you successfully finish a quest or survive exploring the wasteland for a while you will be awarded with weapons, outfits or junk to craft new items with, along with caps to purchase upgrades and new rooms.

The game did really well during its release, and is still doing so, even if people got upset with the game having microtransactions. However, the only advantages those would give you were either more Vault Tec lunch boxes or Mister Handy to collect resources for you. I haven’t purchased either and I still enjoy the game a whole lot. It also gives you a sense of responsibility when you have to gather resources and manage everything on your own without the help of a robot to do it for you.

I would recommend this game for everyone who enjoys simulations and micromanaging, and if you have an interest in the Fallout franchise in general. Have you played anything interesting lately? 

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There’s no place like home after a long day of adventuring. Homestead, The Elder Scrolls Online’s player housing system, is coming in February 2017. Learn what you can expect at launch, including how many homes there will be, how you get them, and details about home decorating and furniture crafting!

When Bethesda first announced that #eso would finally allow us to have a player home, almost two years after its original release, a lot of people thought that this would be just like the Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim expansion, #Hearthfire.

There is nothing wrong with Hearthfire and it was a welcome addition to the game, with the chance to customize your home and the possibility of adopting children, but it did feel a bit limited. With Homestead, however, it seems that Bethesda and Zenimax has gone all out, giving the players the choice of choosing between around 40 unique homes and having over 2000 home decoration items and furniture available for them to craft.

Even with all of this available, the player will not have a full home right away. After finishing the tutorial, all the player is left with is a room in an inn, but they can expand to a proper house afterwards, if they can afford it, of course.

When it comes to the interior decorating part, (something that a lot of players most likely will focus the most on), they claim that no two houses will end up looking the same since there is such a huge variety of items, and crafting styles. You can choose to go all #Argonian style or #Dunmer, or #Nibenese or mix the three (or other styles) if you wish to do so. I’m sure we will find that out when it gets implemented in the game in February.

When it comes to the interior decorating part, (something that a lot of players most likely will focus the most on), they claim that no two houses will end up looking the same since there is such a huge variety of items, and crafting styles. You can choose to go all Argonian or Nibenese or mix the t I’m sure we will find that out when it gets implemented in the game in February.

All of this sounds like it would be a lot to remember, but fret not, Bethesda promised that a handy guide will be available upon its release! They did release a short list full of information though, I’ll include that here.

  • Houses are instanced, so you don’t have to worry about racing to grab the perfect spot of land
  • Furniture you create via Furniture Crafting can be sold to other players
  • You will be able to preview homes before you purchase, both furnished and unfurnished
  • You will be able to allow friends and guildmates to visit your home; they can travel to your home via the group, friends, or guild lists while you’re in it, or by selecting “Visit House” by clicking on your name in those same lists when you’re offline
  • You can grant trusted friends permission to decorate existing placed items in your home (they cannot add or remove items from your home)
  • You can also allow those who are not on your friends list or in your guilds to visit and/or decorate your home by adding them as a “Visitor” or “Decorator” in your House Settings
  • You’ll be able to conveniently fast travel to your homes via the World Map, similar to how Wayshrines currently work (but cost free), as well as directly via the Collections menu
  • You can allow visitors into your new home – a visiting player simply needs to teleport to you
  • Homes are secure – other players are not able to break into homes and steal items. Sorry, Thieves Guild!

Are you looking forward to being able to customize your own home? Does anyone even invest time into stuff like that anymore?

1. Piper Wright – Fallout 4

Piper is a News Journalist located in Diamond City in the Commonwealth. She runs Publick Occurences with her younger sister Nat, and is shunned by many in the city. I really enjoy the chemistry between her and my character, and i always find myself going back to Diamond City to find her and bring her along on my journey.
She also gives the player the perk Gift of Gab when you’re at the maximum relationship level with her. This perk allows you to earn double the amount of experience points when persuading people or discovering new places.

2. Dorian Pavus – Dragon Age: Inquisition

Dorian is a Tevinter mage and will give approval to the Inquisitor when they flirt with them regardless of gender. He is only romantically interested in males though, which kind of broke my heart because he’s such a witty and caring character. The group dynamic in the game just isn’t the same without him, but at least he is a great friend too even if I was not able to romance him.

3. Rex – Fallout: New Vegas

Part German Shepherd, Rex is a cyberhound Mk III law enforcement officer support model that has been around since pre-War times. He was born as a regular dog in 2072 and served in the Denver City Police Department. Sometime before the war, he was cybernetically enhanced and turned into a cyberdog – serial no. B955883, although the circumstances of his cybernetic alterations remain unknown. He survived the destruction of Denver and the harsh wastelands, at one point even fighting as part of Caesar’s Legion[1]. He later reached Freeside, where he came under the ownership of The King, who loves him dearly. Rex does not like rats, or hats, according to The King. The King says his dislike of hats may come from the fact that hat rhymes with rat.

4. Aranea Ienith – The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

Aranea Ienith is a Dunmer priestess of Azura, who protects the Shrine of Azura outside of Winterhold. She wears blue mage robes and boots. Opening the Daedric quest, “The Black Star,” Aranea becomes a possible follower if the Azura’s Star artifact is selected over the Black Star. As a follower, she typically wields magic and prefers her own robes over items placed in her inventory. Unable to be married, Aranea can be inducted into the Blades.

5. Zevran Arainai – Dragon Age: Origins

Zevran is an assassin hired by Teyrn Loghain and is told to kill your character in the game. He sets up a trap to lure you in but you have the opportunity to kill him if you win. I did that the first time i played the game, and when i read the wiki i realized i had missed out on a good companion. Zevran is not afraid of saying what he thinks and he is rather open about his background. I can’t really put my finger on what it is about him, but i can’t ever do a playthrough of the game without having him in my party.

If you play any games like these, who would be your favorite companions to bring along with you on your journey?